The worst way to screw up on your Hawaiian vacation

For sure, lost luggage and sunburn can be a bummer, but we can all agree that the best (worst) way to ruin a vacation is dying. Sadly, about one person a month is lost to a fatal accident in Hawaii while recreating. Happily, virtually all of these deaths can be avoided.

Yay! Hawaii the Big Island Trailblazer turns 20

Independent and adventurous travelers can now celebrate the publication of the 20th anniversary edition of Hawaii the Big Island Trailblazer (ISBN: 978-198039129690), which is good to go on Amazon. Volcano goddess Pele has… Continue reading

Oh no, Kauai’s fabled Kalalau Trail is closed!! No problem, Brah

Kalalau Trail Roads and trails beyond Hanalei Bay on Kauai’s north shore remain closed, after being hammered by a Biblical rainstorm this winter—50 freaking inches in 24 hours. That means a mega-popular attraction,… Continue reading

The wild side of Oahu awaits beyond Waikiki

Waikiki Beach and downtown Honolulu are brimming with tourists, and for good reason: there’s a lot worth doing. But few visitors realize that Oahu has a wealth of undeveloped, easy-access beaches—more than Maui… Continue reading

Hawaii is trying to solve the ‘problem’ of too much success

  Vacations aren’t supposed to be stressful. But a trip to Hawaii can be just that, if you are in a traffic jam on Maui’s Hana Highway, lost in space trying to find… Continue reading

Do you really need guidebook to visit hawaii?

In the age of smart phones, are guidebooks necessary? For most visitors, the answer is “No.” Most visitors are seeing Hawaii for the first time, staying for about a week, and mainly want… Continue reading

How Five Million Years of Hawaiian History Took Place This Year

Five million years ago, Hawaii’s northern-most island, Kauai, was located several hundred miles to the south, where the Big Island is located today. Five million years from now, the Big Island will take… Continue reading

The Big Island’s Mauna Loa: A Mellow Drive up the Most Massive Mountain in the World

Measured from its base below the ocean’s surface, Mauna Loa is well over 40,000 feet high, making it easily the world’s second tallest (Mauna Kea, not far away is 400 feet taller). But… Continue reading